PSY (Psychology)

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology  (4 hours)

This course provides a general introduction to psychology, with an emphasis on helping students appreciate how psychologist attempt to answer questions using the scientific method. Topics within neuropsychology, learning, memory, development, clinical and social psychology are considered from an empirical point of view. Offered every semester (TU); offered twice annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment.

PSY 125 Human Sexuality  (4 hours)

In this course, students will learn about the biological, psychological and social aspects of sexuality. Students will also learn about methods used in the scientific study of sex, and will gain an understanding of the diversity of human sexuality across age, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and culture. Offered every three years.

PSY 200 Independent Study in Psychology  (1-4 hours)

This course provides the opportunity for an intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

PSY 201 Developmental Psychology  (4 hours)

This course will focus on the current scientific thinking about human development from birth to adolescence and will integrate theoretical, research, and applied areas. Topics will include genetics and prenatal development, language acquisition, and cognitive and social development. Specific emphasis will be devoted to the social/cultural factors that may influence development. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 202 Organizational Psychology  (4 hours)

Organizations and the individuals who function within them will be examined from the perspective of psychological theory and research. Consideration will be given both to broad topics relevant to all organizations, such as communications, groups and stress, and to topics specific to the work environment, such as employee selection, training and evaluation. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 203 Learning and Conditioning  (4 hours)

This course examines the empirical and theoretical issues surrounding learned behavior. Most of the data discussed come from studies in operant conditioning.  Emphasis will be placed on how learning principles explain everyday human behavior and are used in the treatment of abnormal behavior patterns. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY 204 Social Psychology  (4 hours)

Social psychology is the study of how our thoughts, feelings and behavior are influenced by the presence of other people. The course will include a consideration of conformity, attraction, aggression, self-presentation, prejudice, helping behavior, and other relevant aspects of social life. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 205 Theories of Personality  (4 hours)

The goal of this course is to acquaint the student with the major theories of personality and with their applications. Students will be encouraged to engage in critical analysis and theoretical comparisons of the ideas presented from diverse, and often contradictory, perspectives. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 206 Abnormal Psychology  (4 hours)

There are three main goals in this course. The first is to enhance the student’s understanding of psychopathology and major treatment approaches. The second is to help the student learn to evaluate critically the research evidence regarding therapeutic interventions. The third is to encourage self-examination of the student’s attitudes and those of our society regarding mental illness and the full range of human individual differences. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 209 Behavioral Neuroscience  (4 hours)

This course focuses on the relationship between biology and behavior. The anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the central nervous system will be reviewed and the current scientific evidence concerning the relationship between biology and behavior will be presented.  Evidence from research involving both physiological manipulations of animals and biological and pathological insults in humans are included. Topics include: research methodology, sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, psychopathology, and plasticity. Offered annually in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101.

PSY 218 Psychology and Law  (4 hours)

Students completing this course will learn to apply psychological research to many processes and controversies within the legal system. Topics to be covered include accuracy of eyewitness testimony, predictions of dangerousness, false or coerced confessions, effects of pretrial publicity, and biases in sentencing. Offered every three years.  Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 290 Special Topics in Psychology  (4 hours)

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: At least PSY 101; see individual course listing in the current semester class schedule for additional prerequisites.

PSY 300 Research Design  (4 hours)

The purpose of this class is to introduce students to the research process in psychology. Students will learn both content (the process of experimentation and scientific thought) as well as how to apply this content to the examination of psychological research questions. Note that this class is specifically for those who are pursuing the B.A.L.S. degree in Psychology. Students who are pursuing the B.S. degree in Psychology must take PSY 320 and PSY 321 instead of PSY 300. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MAT 111.

PSY 303 Psychological Testing  (4 hours)

This course covers the selection, interpretation and applications of psychological tests, including tests of intellectual ability, vocational and academic aptitudes and personality. The most common uses of test results in educational institutions, clinical settings, business, government and the military will be considered. The history of psychological testing and the interpretation of test results also will be considered from both traditional and critical perspectives. Although students will have the opportunity to see many psychological tests, this course is not intended to train students actually to administer tests. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and MAT 111.

PSY 307 Cognitive Psychology  (4 hours)

This course explores the nature and function of human thought processes and the research methods used to study them. Discussion will focus on theories about cognitive phenomena and the assumptions on which these theories and research are based. Topics to be covered include perception, attention, memory, intelligence, problem solving and reasoning, and language. Offered even years in the fall (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 308 Sensation and Perception  (4 hours)

This course explores how our sensory systems detect the physical world around us and how the brain interprets what these sensations mean. Topics covered will include psychophysical methods, signal detection theory, and the neural mechanisms underlying vision, hearing, taste, smell, and touch. Offered even years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 209.

PSY 310 Drugs, the Brain and Behavior  (4 hours)

This course examines the effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system and, subsequently, behavior. Both recreational and illicit drugs and those used to treat mental disorders will be covered. In addition, the underlying brain and environmental factors thought to be responsible for drug addiction, tolerance and sensitivity, and the classification of common psychoactive drugs will be reviewed. Offered odd years in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisites: PSY 101 and PSY 209.

PSY 316 Psychology Through Film  (4 hours)

Through a combination of original sources and complementary films, this course reviews classic and contemporary topics within many key areas of psychology, including abnormal, biopsychology, cognitive, developmental, family systems, forensic, personality, positive, and social. Offered every three years.

Prerequisite: PSY 321.

PSY 320 Psychological Statistics and Research Methods I  (4 hours)

An introduction to research methodology and corresponding statistical techniques. Topics include the scientific method, reliability, validity, basic statistics (e.g., variability, central tendency, z-scores, correlations, regression and Chi-square) and SPSS training.  Students conduct a correlation experiment and learn to write an APA style research paper. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 321 Psychological Statistics and Research Methods II  (4 hours)

An introduction to advanced research methods and corresponding statistical techniques. Topics include experimental methods, internal and external validity, and advanced statistics (e.g., ANOVA, repeated measure).  Students conduct an experimental project and write an APA style research paper. Prerequisite: PSY 320.

PSY 322 Advanced Experimental Psychology  (4 hours)

This sequel to the introductory research methods course provides students with the opportunity to design, conduct, analyze, and report the findings of an individually planned and executed research project. This intensive, semester-long project will allow students to consolidate and apply the knowledge acquired in both PSY 320 and PSY 321, as well as expose students to the real-world challenges that often accompany scientific research. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: PSY 321.

PSY 400 Advanced Independent Study in Psychology  (1-4 hours)

This course provides the opportunity for an intense advanced study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. Prerequisite: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

PSY 405 History and Systems of Psychology  (4 hours)

This course serves as the capstone course and challenges students to synthesize information from all four years of study in psychology. A study of the historic development of modern psychology, this course covers its philosophical and scientific ancestry, the major schools of thought, the contemporary systems of psychology and their theoretical and empirical differences. Offered annually in the spring (TU); offered annually (ADP), contingent upon sufficient enrollment. Prerequisite: Open only to senior psychology majors in their final semester/term of study.

PSY 406 Directed Research in Psychology  (4 hours)

Original investigations and detailed studies of the literature in selected areas of psychology will be supervised by a faculty member. Emphasis will be on original research. Prerequisites: PSY 321 and permission of the instructor.

PSY 407 Internship in Psychology  (1-4 hours)

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to: obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study; submit an application which addresses both the on-site and the academic components of the internship; and satisfy all internship requirements developed by the academic program which oversees the internship. The career development office maintains an extensive list of internships, all of which are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: These are determined by the academic program overseeing the internship course, but typically include: permission of the faculty supervisor; meeting the qualifications for the internship program; obtaining permission of an internship site supervisor; and development of an internship plan which is acceptable to relevant parties including the faculty supervisor and others, as required by the relevant academic program.

PSY 490 Advanced Special Topics in Psychology  (4 hours)

The seminar will provide examination and discussion of various topics of contemporary interest in psychology. Prerequisite: At least PSY 101; see individual course listing in the current semester class schedule for additional prerequisites.

PSY 496 Advanced Special Topics in Biopsychology  (2 hours)

This course will serve as the capstone course for the Biopsychology major. This course will require students to synthesize the knowledge they have acquired during their educational career and apply it to real-world situations. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the relationship between processes that occur in the brain and human behavior. Prerequisite: open only to senior psychology majors in their final semester/term of study. Offered every spring. Cross-listed as BIO 496.