BIO (Biology)

BIO 110 Biological Inquiry (5 hours)

This course uses an active learning approach to introduce students to the broad, fascinating, and rapidly-advancing study of living things.  We will use the scientific method to explore biological principles operating at scales ranging from molecules to communities.  Specific topics will include biochemistry, cell structure and function, genetics, micro- and macro-evolution, physiology and anatomy of plants and animals, organismal diversity, and ecology.  Class will meet for 6 hours per week in 3 or 4 sessions, allowing ample time for student-designed research, structured—but participatory—lectures, demonstrations, collaborative exercises, and observation of live organisms in the lab or their habitat.  Many of these activities will draw from related material in BIO 111 Biostatistics. Pre-requisite: satisfaction of the mathematics proficiency requirement (see Sec. 6.4.1. and Sec. 6.4.2.). Co-requisite: BIO 111. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 111 Biostatistics (2 hours)

This course uses active learning exercises, short lectures, and directed readings to teach management, statistical analysis, and reporting of trends in quantitative data from biological studies. As such, it prepares students to design and conduct their own biological studies and to evaluate published studies in BIO 110 Biological Inquiry (co-required) and upper level biology courses. Pre-requisite: satisfaction of the mathematics proficiency requirement (see Sec. 6.4.1. and Sec. 6.4.2.). Co-requisite: BIO 110.


BIO 200 Independent Study in Biology (1-5 hours)

This course provides the opportunity for an intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. The student and instructor will collaborate to develop the content of the course, which must be approved as outlined by the Independent Study Policy.  (Sec. 6.15.)


BIO 201 Genetics (5 hours)

An introduction to the study of inheritance. Classical patterns of Mendelian inheritance are explored and related to modern molecular genetics, human genetic disorders, ethics and issues of conservation. Includes lecture and laboratory. Laboratory work encourages independent inquiry and requires experimental follow-up outside of dedicated class time. Offered annually in the fall. Prerequisites: BIO 110, BIO 111 and CHM 102 (with laboratory, CHM 102L), with a grade of “C-“or higher in each course.  Prerequisite or co-requisite: CHM 201 or permission from the instructor. Declared Biopsychology majors who have completed the BIO 110, CHM 102 and CHM 102L prerequisites and who have taken, or plan to co-enroll in, PSY 209 will be granted permission to register for BIO 201 even if they have not satisfied all the prerequisites. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 202 Microbiology (5 hours)

An introduction to the biology of viruses, archea, bacteria, algae and fungi. Consideration is given to phylogenetic relationships, taxonomy, physiology and economic or pathogenic significance of each group. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered annually in the spring. Prerequisites: BIO 110, BIO 111 and one semester of Chemistry (including lab) at the 100-level or higher, with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 215 Animal Behavior (5 hours)

This course considers the function, development and evolution of animal behavior, including the physical and physiological bases of behavior, behavioral genetics, social behavior and behavioral ecology. The laboratory component applies the issues addressed in lecture in a hands-on interactive and field-oriented setting. An integrated speaker’s series is part of the interactive intellectual environment cultivated by the course. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered biennially in fall of odd years. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and BIO 111, with a grade of “C-“or higher in each course. Declared Biopsychology majors who have completed PSY 101 will be granted permission to register even if they have not satisfied the prerequisite. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 224 Cancer Biology (5 hours)

Cancer Biology is a synthetic course that provides students with a comprehensive introduction to cancer and that ranges in scope from causes to cures.  By conceptualizing the cellular and molecular basis of known cancer diseases, the students will be prepared to engage in discussions of drug development and clinical strategies.  The course also considers public health and epidemiological approaches that are used to monitor environmental exposures associated with increased cancer risk. Includes lecture and laboratory. Lab exercises, service learning projects, guest speakers from the Atlanta-based cancer community and field trips to relevant off-campus sites will be arranged to allow students to engage in discussion of state-of-the-art cancer research, treatment, policy, prevention and care.  Pre-requisites: completion of BIO 201 with a C- or higher. BIO 224 is an SL-X designated course requiring each student to perform 25 hours of course-related volunteer work. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 252 Biology Seminar (1 hour)

This course introduces students to the mechanics and intellectual components of being a scientist. During this class, students cultivate the skills for framing, researching, preparing and presenting a formal public address on a topic of biological interest (from the biological literature).  Offered annually in the spring. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and BIO 111, with a grade of “C-“or better in each course, and sophomore or higher standing.


BIO 280 Conservation Biology in Hawaii (4 hours)

This course complements BIO 380 Conservation Biology by focusing on the rare and unique biodiversity of the Hawaiian Islands. It moves quickly from the basic goals and methods of Conservation Biology to their application to specific populations of terrestrial and marine species. The course is comprised of approximately four to five lectures/discussion during the fall semester, a 13-day trip to Hawaii between semesters, and a research paper to be completed during the spring semester. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered biennially in the spring of odd years. Prerequisites: Student must be Biology major, with junior or senior standing, and have the permission of the instructor. Seats in this class are limited. Students meeting the prerequisites and also having earned a “C-” or better in BIO 380 or BIO 423 may be granted permission to register before others.


BIO 290 Special Topics in Biology (1-5 hours)

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisites can vary based on the topic selected. See individual course listings for each semester for the specific topic and any prerequisites.


BIO 301 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (5 hours)

This course is an intensive study of the structural aspects of selected vertebrate types. These organisms are studied in relation to their evolution and development. Includes lecture and laboratory. The laboratory involves detailed examination of representative vertebrate specimens. Usually offered annually in the fall. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L), with a grade of “C-“or higher in each course. Junior or senior standing and co-registration in BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L) may be acceptable prerequisites but only with the prior permission of the instructor. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 313 Developmental Biology (5 hours)

This course deals with the dynamic developmental processes in animals that start at fertilization and continue through to the formation of an adult organism. Classical observations in embryology are combined with genetic, cellular and molecular practices to provide a comprehensive understanding of fundamental themes and pathways enabled during development. Course work will allow for students to extrapolate from various development models to the human condition. Includes lecture and laboratory. In the laboratory, living and prepared examples of developing systems in representative invertebrates and vertebrates will be studied using both classical and molecular approaches. Usually offered biennially in spring of even years. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L), with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

BIO 317 Biochemistry (5 hours)

As an introduction to the chemistry of living systems, this course will investigate the structures and functions of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. Central metabolic pathways and enzyme reaction mechanisms also will be studied. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered annually in fall. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L), with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course; recommended prerequisite: CHM 310. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 320 Urban Ecology (5 hours)

The science of Urban Ecology is more than the study of ecology in urban landscapes. It is the integration of natural and social sciences for greater understanding of the emergent phenomena that we call cities. This course describes the state of urban ecological knowledge and best practices for promoting and implementing sustainable development using lectures, readings, discussions, guest speakers, research, and labs. Includes lecture and laboratory. Some labs involve travel to many sites around Atlanta. Usually offered biennially in fall of odd years. Cross-listed as UEP 320. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 380 Conservation Biology (5 hours)

Conservation biology is an interdisciplinary science that attempts to protect and restore biodiversity by describing its spatial and temporal patterns, identifying its threats, and removing its threats. This course covers these goals, philosophies underlying the science, and relevant public policy with lectures, readings, exercises and research. Exercises and research typically involve travel around Atlanta and Georgia. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered biennially in fall of even years. Prerequisite: A grade of “C-” or higher in BIO 201, or concurrent enrollment in BIO 201. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 400 Advanced Independent Study in Biology (1-5 hours)

This course provides the opportunity for an advanced, intense study of diverse topics under the direct supervision of the instructor. These offerings are generally suited for junior or senior students. The student and instructor will collaborate to develop the content of the course, which must be approved as outlined by the Independent Study Policy.  (Sec. 6.15.)

Specifically, this Biology course is supervised research on a selected project or paper with a student entering his or her final year of study in the major. To qualify, students must propose a topic that requires consultation and analysis of the primary scientific literature germane to the topic. Students enrolling in this course for more than 3 semester hours must propose original research that includes review of relevant primary literature, data collection in the field and/or lab, data analysis, and a formal research presentation. Prerequisites: 25 semester hours in biology, with a grade of “B-” or higher in each course; junior or senior standing; permission of the instructor.

BIO 402 Human Physiology (5 hours)

This course is a detailed analysis of human functions that deals primarily with the interactions involved in the operation of complex human systems. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered annually in the spring. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L), with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

BIO 414 Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (5 hours)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of molecular bioscience. Topics covered include the principles and processes of molecular biology, DNA isolation and characterization, restriction enzyme analysis, cloning, construction and selection of recombinants made in vitro and preparation and analysis of gene libraries. Includes lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO 201 and CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L), with a grade of “C-” or higher in each course. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 418 Cell Biology (5 hours)

This course is an in-depth consideration of cellular evolution, cellular ultra-structure and the molecular mechanisms of cell physiology. Students will practice techniques involving the culturing and preparation of cells and tissues for examination by fluorescence microscopy, biochemical analysis and cell behavioral assays. The course culminates with each student designing and executing an independent research project. Includes lecture and laboratory. Usually offered biennially in spring of odd years. Prerequisites: BIO 201, CHM 201 (with laboratory, CHM 201L) and one additional biology course (with laboratory) at the 200-level or higher. A grade “C-“or higher must be earned in each of the prerequisite courses. A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 423 Ecology (5 hours)

This course investigates the features of the environment that dictate where an organism lives and what density its population can achieve. It takes a quantitative approach and uses a variety of model organisms (for example, salamanders and students) in lecture and lab. Laboratories involve considerable fieldwork and travel to sites around Atlanta and the Southeast. Usually offered biennially in spring of even years. Prerequisites: BIO 111 and BIO 201, with a grade of “C-“or higher in each course; also, junior or senior standing (or permission of the instructor). A non-refundable fee is billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.


BIO 490 Advanced Special Topics in Biology (1-5 hours)
Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. These offerings are generally suited for junior or senior students. Prerequisites can vary based on the topic selected. See individual course listings for each semester for the specific topic and any prerequisites.

BIO 495 Internship in Biology (1-12 hours)
An internship designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to have an application (which satisfies all internship requirements developed by the academic program that oversees the internship) and to obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study. All internships are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites are determined by the academic program overseeing the internship course.
BIO 496 Advanced Special Topics in Biopsychology (2 hours)

Advanced courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. These offerings are generally suited for junior or senior students. Prerequisites can vary based on the topic selected. See individual course listings for each semester for the specific topic and any prerequisites.

Specifically, this course will serve as the capstone course for the Biopsychology major.  This course will require students to synthesize the knowledge they have acquired during their educational career and apply it to real-world situations.  Students will be encouraged to think critically about the relationship between processes that occur in the brain and human behavior. Course Prerequisites:  PSY 320 and PSY 321. Class Standing Prerequisite: Open only to senior Biopsychology majors in their final semester/term of study. Offered every spring. Cross-listed as PSY 496.


BIO 499 Evolution Seminar (1 hour)

Evolution is the fundamental and unifying theme of modern Biology. As such, it is the focus of our one credit hour seminar capstone for Biology majors with senior status. The seminar is team taught by the Biology faculty. Each instructor uses the primary literature and discussion to lead a multi-week, in-depth exploration of up to three evolution-oriented topics in their areas of expertise or current interest. Topics will vary by offering. Offered annually in fall. Prerequisite: senior standing. (