ENG (English, English and Comparative Literature)

ENG 101  Ancient Literature  (4 hours)

This course will examine the literature of the ancient world. The primary focus will be on Greek and Roman literature. Works and authors might include: Homer, Aristophanes, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plautus, Terence, Seneca, Petronius, Ovid, and Virgil. Offered every fall.

ENG 102  Medieval and Renaissance Literature  (4 hours)

This course will examine the transition of the cultural world of Dante to that of Shakespeare and Milton. Although the primary focus will be Western, non-Western works may also be studied. Texts and authors might include: Beowulf, Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Rabelais, Chaucer, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. Offered every spring.

ENG 103  18th and 19th Century Literature  (4 hours)

Authors in this course might include: Defoe, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Brontë, Hardy and George Eliot. Offered every fall.

ENG 104  Modern and Contemporary Literature  (4 hours)

This course will investigate the literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Authors might include: T.S. Eliot, Woolf, Lawrence, Forster, Joyce, Beckett and Pynchon. Offered every spring.

ENG 105  Global Literatures  (4 hours)

This course will survey contemporary works of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature in translation around the world. Authors include Gustave Flaubert, Franz Kafka, Higuchi Ichiyo, Jorge Luis Borges, Colm Tóibín, Margaret Atwood, and Chimamanda Adichie.

ENG 200  Independent Study in Literature and Composition  (1-4 hours)

This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ENG 201  Chaucer  (4 hours)

Students will learn to read and appreciate the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, the first great English poet, in his original language; to enjoy the rich and varied nature of his works—to appreciate why he is called “the Father of English.” Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Offered every other year.

ENG 204  Shakespeare: Early Plays to 1603  (4 hours)

This course will examine the genres and plays that define Shakespeare’s career up until 1603, the year marking the end of Elizabeth I’s reign and the start of James I’s. This chronology will allow a focus on the genre Shakespeare defined known as the “History Play,” comedies through Twelfth Night, “problem comedies” such as All’s Well That Ends Well, and tragedies up through Hamlet. Offered in alternate years. Fulfills English Department requirement for Shakespeare or Chaucer. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Students who have taken ENG 206 may take ENG 204 for 300-level elective credit.

ENG 206  Shakespeare: Late Plays, 1603-1613  (4 hours)

This course will examine the genres and plays that define Shakespeare’s career after 1603, the year marking the end of Elizabeth I’s reign and the start of James I’s, up until the playwright’s presumed retirement. This chronology will allow a focus on most of Shakespeare’s greatest tragedies and his best “Romances.” Offered in alternate years. Fulfills English Department requirement for Shakespeare or Chaucer. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher). Students who have taken ENG 204 may take ENG 206 for 300-level elective credit.

ENG 210  Introduction to Literary and Cultural Studies  (4 hours)

This course is designed as an introduction to the methods and tools of research in the study of literature, including textual, critical, social, historical, and cultural approaches. Readings, exercises, assignments, and discussions are designed to help students develop transferable research and writing skills, applicable to both academic and non-academic settings. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102 (concurrent enrollment acceptable).

ENG 220   Literary Tribalism: How to Read Race, Class, Nation, and Gender  (4 hours)
Beginning with a rereading of Harper Lee’s seminal To Kill a Mockingbird in terms of region, race, and class, students then move from a discussion of whiteness and The South to depictions of immigration, transnationalism, black and Native American culture, all while also reading important essays of Cultural Studies that should inspire students to come up with their own research questions for the course. Prerequisites: COR 101 and COR 102 (concurrent enrollment acceptable). Cross-listed as WGS 290.

ENG 230  Creative Writing  (4 hours)

This course is an introduction to writing poetry and prose fiction. The student will be asked to submit substantial written work each week, keep a journal and read published writers. Much class time will be spent discussing student and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 231  Biography and Autobiography  (4 hours)

This course is an introduction to biographical and autobiographical writing with practice in the personal narrative and personal essay as well as other forms such as the profile and the interview. Students will submit substantial written work each week and keep a journal. The class will follow a workshop format, discussing the students’ and published work. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 240  Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies  (4 hours)

This course aims to provide a foundation in intermediate literary and cultural studies skills via a topics approach that allows for greater breadth of coverage across multiple time periods and different genres within British, American, and global literature. Possible topics include “Postcolonialism,” “Modernity,” “Nation and Community,” or “Women’s Writing.” Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 241  Topics in Genre Studies  (4 hours)

This course examines a selected literary genre (including fiction, poetry, drama and non-fiction) within and across a range of historical periods and cultural and national contexts. In addition to learning about genres, students will develop skills of close reading, textual support, inter-textual analysis and critical thinking. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of   “C-“ or higher).

ENG 330  Writing Poetry  (4 hours)

In weekly assignments students will try free verse and various forms in the effort to discover and to embody more and more truly what they have to say. Much time will be spent reading published poets, responding to student work in class and trying to generate language that reveals rather than explains intangible “meanings.” Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 331  Writing Prose, Fiction and Nonfiction  (4 hours)

Students will get instruction and substantial practice in writing fictional and nonfictional prose which aims at getting what Henry James called “a sense of felt life” onto the page. The class will follow a workshop format with weekly assignments, journal writing, extensive discussion of student work and reading of published examples. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 340  Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies  (4 hours)

This advanced level course will explore a particular topic in a Literary and Cultural Studies sub-area, including both specific British, American, and global authors, and specific eras of English and global literature from the Medieval Period through the present. Students will read and write critically about literary texts (written and visual), cultural theory, and avenues of inquiry that theoretical approaches open. Students will also learn how to locate and evaluate the resources that literary and cultural studies depend on, and how to use disciplinary-specific methods of presenting and documenting work. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 341  Advanced Topics in Genre Studies  (4 hours)

This advanced level course will facilitate the intensive study of the historical development of a selected genre (poetry, drama, fiction, literary non-fiction); major critical theories and approaches, current as well as foundational; and the historical, cultural, and ideological conditions under which specific genres have been produced and received. Students will also learn how to locate and evaluate the resources that genre studies depend on, and how to use disciplinary-specific methods of presenting and documenting work. Topics vary by semester. Prerequisite: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 393  Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies  (4 hours)

Courses relating literature with aspects of social and intellectual history or a particular issue or theme. Possible offerings may include women in literature, American civilization, African-American (or other ethnic) literature, popular culture, the literature of a single decade, children’s literature and myth and folklore in literature. Usually offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 394  Special Topics in Major Authors  (4 hours)

An intensive study of between one and three major authors or texts. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course (the last with a grade of “C-“ or higher).

ENG 400  Advanced Independent Study in Literature and Composition  (1-4 hours)

Supervised study in specified genres or periods. Prerequisites: COR 101, COR 102 and one 100-level English course; submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

ENG 401  Internship in English  (1-4 hours)

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to: obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study; submit an application which addresses both the on-site and the academic components of the internship; and satisfy all internship requirements developed by the academic program which oversees the internship. The career development office maintains an extensive list of internships, all of which are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: These are determined by the academic program overseeing the internship course, but typically include: permission of the faculty supervisor; meeting the qualifications for the internship program; obtaining permission of an internship site supervisor; and development of an internship plan which is acceptable to relevant parties including the faculty supervisor and others, as required by the relevant academic program.