THE (Theatre)

THE 100 Production Laboratory (1 hour)

Production Lab is a course for Theatre majors who participate in OU Theatre full productions throughout the semester. This 1-unit lab is designed to offer a diversity of experience and provide students with comprehensive and hands-on training in the creation of a fully realized theatrical production. Theatre majors are required to take Production Lab for four semesters, concentrating on at least two different areas of production (e.g., two semesters as an actor and two semesters as Asst. Electrician or some other role). The primary meeting times for this class will vary depending on the individual student’s schedule and role in each production. All required meetings, rehearsals, production crew hours and performances will be clearly specified for each student. A non-refundable fee will be billed to every student who is registered for this course at the end of the drop/add period.

THE 105 Beginning Characterization (4 hours)

This course explores the physical and mental foundations necessary for successful stage performance. Students will be expected to engage in hands-on exercises, physical and vocal warm-ups and performance work (both individual and partnered) throughout the semester. The basic principles of the Stanislavski method will be explored through improvisation, movement, vocalization and contemporary characterization.

THE 200 Independent Study in Theatre (1-4 hours)

This course will be conducted as supervised research on a selected topic. Prerequisites: Submission of an application which contains a proposed, detailed outline of study approved by the instructor, the division chair, the student’s advisor and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

THE 205 Intermediate Characterization (4 hours)

Intermediate Characterization explores the methods of 20th century American acting teacher Sanford Meisner. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of his approach to acting, which builds upon the theories of Constantin Stanislavski. Meisner’s technique will be uncovered through immersive studio exercises, in-depth scene study assignments and review and discussion of Meisner textbooks and other related literature. Prerequisite: THE 105.

THE 210 Theatre History I: Greeks to Renaissance (4 hours)

An in-depth study of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of particular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance styles as well. Periods covered include: Greek, Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan and Restoration.

THE 220 Theatre History II: Restoration to 20th Century (4 hours)

An in-depth study of theatrical history, examining not only the theatrical literature of particular periods, but the staging practices, costuming, social customs and performance styles as well. Periods and styles covered include: Renaissance, Neo-classic, Sentimental Comedy, Domestic Tragedy, Melodrama and Realism.

THE 290 Special Topics in Theatre (4 hours)

Courses of selected topics will be offered periodically as determined by the needs of the curriculum. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.

THE 305 Shakespearean Performance (4 hours)

This course affords the advanced acting student an opportunity to explore methods for rehearsing and performing texts written by William Shakespeare. With a focus on the practical demands of Shakespeare’s language, the course addresses technical, stylistic, historical and interpretive considerations as they relate to performance. Prerequisite: THE 205 or permission of the instructor.

THE 310 Stagecraft (4 hours)

Stagecraft provides hands-on experience and assignments designed to physically and mentally engage the technician and designer. This class will focus on historical perspective as well as individual research and design. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a mid-term examination, written assignments, the completion of a minimum number of practicum hours and a final design project.

THE 315 Scenic Design (4 hours)

This course explores the artistic and theoretical aspects of scenic design for the theatre. Topics covered will include the history of scenography, the elements of design, play analysis from the designer’s perspective, historical research, conceptualization, rendering and modeling techniques. Discussions and design projects will draw from a variety of contemporary and classical plays.

THE 316 Lighting Design (4 hours)

This course covers the tools and techniques of designing lighting for various stage forms as well as the creative planning and implementation of designs for specific productions. This course explores the basic principles of design, the science of light, play analysis from the designer’s perspective and painting with light. Other topics include translating theatrical moments and music into lighting sketches, storyboards and atmospheres; creating transitions from one atmosphere to another; and developing points of view.  Learning and demonstrating standardized safety protocols when working with lighting equipment and electrics will also be a central feature of the course.

THE 317 Costume Design (4 hours)

The class is designed to give students a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students will develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume rendering will provide tools for students to produce final projects.

THE 330 Directing for the Stage I (4 hours)

This course offers the intermediate to advanced theatre student an opportunity to explore the foundations of play directing. Through practical exercises and assignments, students will experience the process of theatre directing from preproduction to performance. A variety of approaches will be investigated for each phase of the director’s work: play analysis, interpretation, collaborating with designers, casting and rehearsing. Emphasis is placed on directing scenes within the style of contemporary realism.  Prerequisite: THE 205.

THE 340 Directing for the Stage II (4 hours)

Building on the foundations of directing developed in Directing for the Stage I, this course explores the unique demands of directing plays with heightened language and theatrical style. The plays of Shakespeare, Chekhov, Ibsen, Beckett and Ionesco will be considered among others. The format of this course is a directing practicum focusing on the director’s process in the rehearsal room. Prerequisite: THE 330

THE 350 Playwriting (4 hours)

Through reading plays, studying structure and form, and writing in and outside the classroom, this course will enable the student to write a short play or develop fully realized scenes for a longer piece. Students will discover the value of events, action, stakes and subtext in their own writing, combining classic structure with their creative impulses. In addition to exploring the creative process, students will be required to practice the arts of revising, rewriting and editing. The student should be prepared to read plays, write daily and bring work to every class.

THE 400 Advanced Independent Study in Theatre (1-4 hours)

Supervised research on a selected topic related to theatre. Prerequisite: Submission of a proposed outline of study that includes a schedule of meetings and assignments approved by the instructor, the division chair and the provost or associate provost. The completed application must be submitted to the office of enrollment services no later than the final day of the drop/add period of the semester of study. For additional criteria, see Independent Study Policy (Sec. 6.15.).

THE 405 Voice and Speech for the Actor (4 hours)

This course teaches students the tenants of healthy and expressive vocal production for speaking theatrical texts. Students will practice exercises for centering the breath and body, locating and releasing vocal tension, exploring pitch and resonance, and working towards a free and well-placed voice for the stage.  Students will be introduced to the basics of vocal anatomy.  Text work will include contemporary American drama and approaches to speaking Shakespearean text. Prerequisite: THE 105.

THE 407 Internship in Theatre (1-4 hours)

An internship is designed to provide a formalized experiential learning opportunity to qualified students. The internship generally requires the student to: obtain a faculty supervisor in the relevant field of study; submit an application which addresses both the on-site and the academic components of the internship; and satisfy all internship requirements developed by the academic program which oversees the internship. The career development office maintains an extensive list of internships, all of which are graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: These are determined by the academic program overseeing the internship course, but typically include: permission of the faculty supervisor; meeting the qualifications for the internship program; obtaining permission of an internship site supervisor; and development of an internship plan which is acceptable to relevant parties including the faculty supervisor and others, as required by the relevant academic program.

THE 410 Movement for the Actor (4 hours)

Drawing from traditional and current trends in movement training for the actor, this course will explore the fundamentals of the most prevailing movement techniques studied today. The techniques and systems investigated will vary each time the course is offered, but may include: Alexander, Commedia dell’arte, contact improvisation, Grotowski, Laban, Lecoq, stage combat and Viewpoints among others. Prerequisite: THE 105.

THE 490 Advanced Special Topics in Theatre (4 hours)

This course will be a study of a selected topic in theatre. Recent topics have focused on adapting non-dramatic texts for the stage, devised and collaborative theatre, and advanced playwriting. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.  riting.. Prerequisite: See individual course listing in the current semester course schedule.